Wednesday, August 25, 2010

ATV Silent Exhaust

ATV Silent Exhaust

The easiest way to get more power from your quad is by adjusting the airflow through your engine. Simply changing the intake on your quad will give you an increase in power because you force more oxygen into the combustion chamber.

But some people desire a different outcome... QUIET.

From hunters to nature photographers or just people who want a more quiet ride, there's companies that produce exhaust systems that actually silence the noise from your ATV. Maybe you're more aware of the noise you put out or concerned about hpw it affects others or maybe you just don't want to be seen or heard. Whatever the reason, there's a system for you.

Have fun,

Monday, August 16, 2010

What Makes Good ATV Trails?

What Makes Good ATV Trails?

There are thousands of ATV trails throughout North America (and more are being charted every day), but how do you judge whether you’ve found a good one or not? Here, we’ll examine a few of the elements that you need to look for when deciding where to take your four-wheeled “baby” for your next pleasure cruise.

Generally, if you’re someone who is familiar with four-wheeling, you’ll want an ATV trail that has some length to it. Otherwise, you could risk becoming bored when you just go in circles in the same field.

ATV trails can be a few to a hundred miles long; start small and gradually build up your endurance. If you’re a beginner, ask a more experienced ATV operator to show you the ropes; heading out on your own is a dicey proposition and not recommended.

You want an ATV trail that matches your ability, or it won’t be much fun. Thus, if you’re a novice, don’t start your four-wheeling hobby in an extremely mountainous region or one that requires a great deal of ATV riding know-how.

Similarly, if you’re someone who has a great deal of ATV operation experience, you should find a suitable trail or you’ll be overcome by ennui an hour into your excursion.

One of the greatest aspects of ATV riding is enjoying the natural surroundings, so be certain that your next trail ride is one that includes some amazing views or which allows you to soak in the beauty of the area. Remember you don’t have to be a photographer, an artist or a poet to be moved by a snaking stream or a radiant sunrise.

Not sure if a trail or area is open to ATV travelers? Then stop before gunning your motor and don’t ride on any trail or in any region until you have been given the “okay” by either the property owner or a legal authority.

Far too many four-wheeling enthusiasts have given the sport a bad name by ripping through private property or tearing up national parks. There are plenty of legal ATV trails out there; make sure the one you choose is on the up-and-up or you could be hammered with a heavy fine.

The last thing you want is to get lost during an ATV trail ride. Riding without the proper gear while outside in the elements can be uncomfortable, scary, and deadly in some situations. Therefore, if you’re unfamiliar with your ATV trail, make sure you obtain a map of the region so you can stay aware of your bearings. Even if you never need to glance at the map, it’s still better to have it than to end up wondering, “Where the heck am I?” while a dark night approaches.

Finally, one of the most important elements of a great ATV trail is that it is one you want to share with friends and other riders. You will know you’ve found an awesome path when you can’t wait to start bragging about your recent excursion to other four-wheeling adventurers. After all, when you’ve found something that’s really exciting, it’s up to you to share the news with your friends.

Have fun,

Monday, August 9, 2010

Understanding How ATV Riding affects Nature

Understanding How ATV Riding affects Nature

There has always been great debate between motor sport activists who want to enjoy riding their machines in the outdoors and other nature lovers who claim that off-road motor vehicles harm the environment and ruin the area for anyone who wants to enjoy the outdoors in other ways.

The argument can be made that motorcycle and ATV riders have as much right to use state lands as anyone else, but most other outdoor activities don’t interfere with riding the way riding can interfere with hiking, hunting, fishing, bird watching, or even the balance of nature and maintaining consistent flood plains.

Although there may always be a conflict, understanding what other nature lovers do and how your riding affects them will help keep ATV riding in current areas, and possibly help it spread to even more areas.

The number one justification for banning ATV riding in certain areas is the detrimental affect it can have on the environment. Although ATVs smoke, are noisy, and help redistribute the mud on a piece of property, these factors have little affect on the environment.

However, ATV riding, if done improperly or carelessly can damage waterways and have very noticeable effects on the local environment. The biggest and most likely risk is damage done to vegetation on the banks of waterways and nearby areas. Because those plants hold the riverbank together, if the plants are killed by riding over them, the soil in that area can be easily washed away, changing the flow of the river and oftentimes causing flooding.

This kind of flooding causes damage to bottomlands, which is usually very fertile and a hotspot for deer, turkey, wild mushrooms, a plethora of wild birds, and many other things that other nature lovers seek out. In addition, increased erosion along rivers and streams cause fine sediment to fill the water, making it difficult for creatures like tadpoles and crawdads to grow and develop, which hurts the ecosystem, as well as the fish population and fishing opportunities.

Most state laws do permit you to cross a river or stream on an ATV, but the most damage comes from riding up and down waterways because so much sediment is stirred up in the water.

Other than not damaging waterways and floodplains, there are several other things you can do to ensure that your riding doesn’t interfere with other activities that go on alongside the trail. For the most part, you should be fine as long as you keep your riding on the trail. It is when you stray from the trail that you will bump into people who don’t appreciate motor sports as much as you, and you may, in some cases, ruin their entire day.

If you ride in areas that permit hunting, you should take a minute or two to find out what animals are in season so you know what else is going on in the woods. Many hunters complain of ATV riders driving by their hunting spots to see if they’re having any luck. Although most hunters don’t mind chatting it up, keep in mind that many hunters look forward to bagging a big deer or turkey for months, and an ATV off the trail is often enough to disrupt an animal’s normal patterns and keep hunters from seeing anything.

It would be the same as if you were looking forward to a riding an area, only to turn your back for a second and have a hunter ruin your trip by slashing your tires. Your day, as well as weeks or months of planning and anticipation, would be destroyed in a few short seconds. The same can be true of bird watchers, hikers, and people fishing in streams and ponds where you ride. Although you may not realize it, an ATV is a noticeable presence in the woods, and not one that all creatures, including humans, appreciate.

Although there can be some conflict between motor sports lovers and other outdoor enthusiasts, a little respect can go a long way. Also keep in mind that many people who hunt, fish, hike, etc, also ride or have ridden ATV’s and vice versa. Many hunters will use ATV trails to cover ground quickly and get into areas that are usually undisturbed and catch their prey unsuspecting. Most hunters realize that deer and turkey do get used to the sight and sound of ATVs on trails.

However, when you leave the trail with your ATV, you are disturbing the wildlife and possibly flood plains, which give other nature lovers and lawmakers a solid reason to restrict ATV riding to certain designated areas.

Have fun,

Monday, August 2, 2010

What ATV Trail Best Suits You?

What ATV Trail Best Suits You?

“I’ve found the best ATV trail! You have to try it!”

How many times have you heard that statement from one of your ATV-loving friends and then rushed out to have a terrific ATV riding excursion, only to find that you’re not all that enthralled by a trail that another four-wheeling enthusiast has deemed “awesome”?

Since you are an individual with a definite personality and not a robot without preferences, what leaves you breathless in terms of an ATV trail might not raise the pulse or even eyebrow of another ATV rider and vice versa. Hence, we’ve put together the following guide to help you figure out the perfect ATV trail for you.

--If you’re someone who likes speed and want to feel the wind rushing past you, then you’ll probably like an ATV trail that’s flat and fast.

Flat and fast trails are best described as terrain that allows you to gun your ATV’s motor and quickly get from one point to the next. Your best bet is to find a low-lying area, as mountainous regions rarely have long stretches that include no twists or turns. ATV trails in the middle states of America lend themselves to this kind of speedy ATV riding, as they are notoriously level and have an attractive, earthy quality.

--If you’re a four-wheel rider who loves the thrill of wicked turns, then you should consider an ATV trail that’s twisting and wild.

You can hoot and holler along an ATV path that winds its way through a wooded area or along a stream bed. Do your best to avoid extremely rocky areas as they can be dangerous, but don’t be afraid of taking on some of the smaller hills and roaring your ATV around some of the more adventurous terrain.

--If you’re an enthusiast who loves steep climbing followed by hair-raising descents, you might enjoy an ATV trail that’s up and down.

Head to the mountains, my friend! In the mountains, you will find exactly what you’re searching for in terms of rollercoaster-like ATV adventures! Not only will you be able to test your ATV’s moxie on some serious grades, but you’ll also be able to whiz down scenic mountainsides. Remember to keep your speed in check, though; up and down terrain is only safe when you keep a cool head and a conservative pace.

--If you’re a laid-back person who just enjoys a little bit of everything, why not try an ATV trail that’s a buffet?

The “buffet” is ideal for the ATV trail rider who can’t make up his or her mind as to what the “perfect” excursion might be. And, best of all, these types of hodgepodge ATV journeys can be found almost anywhere in the country. In fact, you might just find all the necessary elements of a mixture of hills, valleys, vistas, and gravel paths within a few miles of your own home.

No matter what your personality type, you can rest assured that there is an ATV trail out there for you and never be afraid to go outside your preferred style. Even if you’re a hard-and-fast “buffet” four-wheeling lady or gent, you just might discover that you actually harbor a secret love of “twisting and wild” ATV paths. You’ll never know until you try, so get out there and start exploring!

Have fun,

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

How To Beef-Up Your ATV

How To Beef-Up Your ATV

With new ATV’s coming out every year, a quad that is king of the mountain one year may fall back to the middle of the pack the next year. And, of course, the more you ride and get comfortable with your ATV, the braver you are going to get and eventually reach a point when you have perfected the art of riding and run into a mud pit you can’t cross or notice that some other quads can get the jump on you.

Many people simply trade their quad when this happens, but there are a lot of things you can do to your quad to get even more power or custom tune your ATV to suit the terrain in your area or your riding style.

One of the easiest ways to tailor your quad to local riding conditions is to simply change your how you grip the ground. There is a large variety of tires on the market that are made for extreme mudding, sand, and all out speed over any terrain. The most obvious factor you can change about your tires is the tread pattern.

Mud tires will typically have a deep, well-spaced tread with a lot of surface area, which allows it to push against slippery mud. Although tread pattern comes into play when playing in the mud, so does sidewall strength and tire thickness. A mud tire with a thicker sidewall will give you more consistent performance when you’re axle deep in sludge. Many people find that lighter rims also give them a slight edge in the mud.

Like mud, getting through sand is made much easier with tread that can push and grab a lot of sand. However, if you’re trying to get faster, especially through the corners, you might benefit from a knobby open-patterned tire that is designed to grip trails without deep mud pits. You can also get tires to make the ride a little softer or give you a firmer grip, but the tires only affect how you grip the trail.

Sometimes it’s necessary add some muscle to your quad to get the performance you’re looking for.

Although there were once many people who would change sprockets to get more low-end power or top-end speed out of their quads, most of today’s quads have balanced gearing based on weight, engine power, and what it was designed to do. Many riders find that tinkering with sprockets don’t change their quad’s performance characteristics as much as they’d like, and instead turn to performance modifications to squeeze more power from their ride.

Although you can go deep into your engine and change cams and other parts that will make your engine even more stout, you can get noticeable results from more affordable and less complicated modifications.

The easiest way to get more power from your quad is by adjusting the airflow through your engine. Simply changing the intake on your quad will give you an increase in power because you force more oxygen into the combustion chamber. Switching to a less restrictive exhaust will get more power to your wheels since the engine doesn’t have to work as hard to breathe.

Headers are another bolt-on modification that will let your engine work more efficiently and add power to your quad.

One popular modification that makes it possible to take on really deep mud holes is a snorkel kit and exhaust extension. A risk you run when diving into mud is that you will suck some mud through your intake, or it will enter your engine through your exhaust. Getting mud or water in your engine will shut it down in a hurry and may require a trip to the shop to get all the water out of your engine. A snorkel kit may be necessary to get through some mud holes you encounter when riding.

Regardless of what kind of quad you ride, with the horde of new ATV’s that come out year after year, sooner or later it will fall to the middle of the pack. The good news is that aftermarket parts are also getting better all the time, which allows you to custom tune your quad without breaking the bank.

Have fun,

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

If you should encounter a horse while you are riding your ATV

If you should encounter a horse while you are riding your ATV

If you should encounter a horse while you are riding your ATV, always yield to the horse and rider. Go out of your way to make sure that the horse has seen and heard you.

In addition, you will want to give the horse adequate room to pass you on the trail. Remember that motorized recreation vehicles, such as ATVs, can usually be heard coming, and the horse rider may be well out of the way.

If not, be courteous, and shut off your motor. Then allow the rider to get a safe distance beyond you before you start it back up again. If you happen to notice that a horse is becoming edgy, nervous, or agitated, always turn off your engine. Then ask the rider what you can do to make the situation better for him/her and the horse.

If you are planning a ride on a trail designed for ATV use, keep in mind that there is always a good chance that you may encounter someone who is using the trail for a purpose other than the driving of ATVs. In these situations, it is best to give others the respect that you desire from them.

Be active in your effort to hear and see others who are on your trails. When you do encounter them, always yield.

Have fun,

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Courtesy While Driving an ATV

Courtesy While Driving an ATV

Since its introduction to the public in the 1970's, those who ride All-Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) have had to deal with a number of issues regarding their behavior. Some of these issues deal with safety, while others deal with rider's behavior towards sharing trails and those whose land they trespass on.

Many drivers irresponsibly disregard laws that prohibit the use of ATVs in certain areas. Because of this, hundreds of trails have been designated as safe and legal places for ATV riders to use. As with all forms of vehicular travel, there are a number of rules, both implied and legislated, which have been developed to ensure the safety of those who drive ATVs.

Regardless of why someone is using a trail, it is important to remember that all trail users are responsible for watching and listening for others. This should result in those who use trails actively looking and listening for others, as opposed to merely reacting when someone or something comes their way. This approach will go a long way towards preventing the accidents and misunderstandings that can take place on the trails.

It is generally accepted that traveling on the right side of the trail removes indecision about the proper side on which to pass. If you need to pass on the left for one reason or another, always ask for and get permission before you do so.

Make sure that you are able to slow down significantly and use caution at all curves and junctions. While riding an ATV is not the time that you want to experience a surprise! Surprises are never safe - regardless of what type of vehicle you happen to be riding!

Unfortunately, the great majority of responsible riders have had their reputation negatively affected by those who do not follow the rules of the trails and who do not take the necessary time to be courteous. Simple courtesy and respect for others and their property will discourage riders of ATVs from riding on non-designated trails, or from using other's private land without permission. This type of responsible thinking will also prevent riders from driving their ATV under the influence of alcohol or drugs. A number of accidents happen each year because of this unfortunate behavior.

Have fun,